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110 Grassington Crescent
Liverpool
L25 9SB
+44 (0) 151 428 8753
LiverpoolMaleVoiceChoir@gmail.com

How it all began


The Liverpool Male Voice Choir originated, in essence, in the early 1830’s when a Wesleyan chapel was built on a site now occupied by St Mary’s C of E church in South Drive, Wavertree. St Mary's Church was built in 1910.

The Wesleyan Church brotherhood meetings were held on Sunday afternoons and there was some good singing, but they lacked leadership, until they were joined by a young man called David Green. He had recently moved from Kettering and since he had some musical ability, he was asked to lead the Brotherhood choir at Victoria Park. His involvement created a greater interest in male singing and there was talk of forming a Male Voice Choir.

On 8th June 1911, 12 men met above a Fish and Chip shop at 55 High Street, Wavertree, to discuss this very issue and it was decided to form a Male Voice Choir and call it “Wavertree Imperial Glee Union”. The picture (below) is one which was taken in 1911, is the man himself, David Green.

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Some time in 1913 we became “The Wavertree Male Voice Choir” In June 1937 a proposal was put to the committee that the choir should change its name to “The Liverpool Male Voice Choir”. This would also prevent a newer organisation from claiming the name. This was put to the members at the Annual General Meeting in Crane Hall on Thursday 16th June 1937, with 35 votes to 3 the new name was adopted.

The choir has transcended two world wars and many good and bad times... and we're still here.

A Trip down memory lane


Photos

Choir Badges


Badges

In the first 38 years of the choir’s existence, we could find no mention of uniforms and there seems to have been no consistency.

In 1949 there was a reference at a committee meeting to the desirability of a “uniformity of dress”, but no action seems to have been taken. In January 1950 the choir decided to buy ties, but there is very little information available at this stage. In October 1951 there was talk of buying a uniform, but in January 1952 this was to be left in abeyance.

It was not until February 1954, with the choir already 43 years old, that the committee decided that blazers would be bought for about £4-15-0 each (i.e. £4.75). The choir would contribute 10/- (i.e. 50p) per person and 6/6 (32p) would be refunded from the prize money at Rhyl festival, to compensate for bus fares to reach the festival. The members would then pay 2/6 (7 1/2p) per week to the treasurer until the blazers were paid for. It was decided to keep the blue tie. We can only assume that the blazers were black, since there was no mention of their colour.

In July 1955 it was decided to purchase a badge for the blazers. Other than the picture of it, there is no more information about this badge. In 1980 it was decided that we needed to have a new uniform to brighten our image and a green blazer and a not very popular beigey coloured trousers were bought (see the green badge below).

After about 16 years of service, we were having trouble obtaining a good colour match when new members arrived, so we decided to completely change the uniform colour. (see maroon badge below). Finally we come to our current uniform of gold blazers and black trousers.

In December 2020, Joe Rutherford who sings in our Baritone section has kindly donated a large amount of money towards our next generation of uniforms. We are starting the process of deciding what are next uniforms will look like.


Photo Gallery


Nordic Church 2019

Nordic Church with the Felling Male Voice Choir
June 2019.

Nordic Church 2019

Nordic Church with the Felling Male Voice Choir
June 2019.

Leeds Town Hall 1986

LMVC joined Leeds MVC and others at the magnificent Leeds Town Hall in 1986. We were to take part again in 1991.

Harington Hall

Harington Hall - August 2019
Raised £1,000 for Blossom Fields
Blossom Fields is a craft workshop and enterprise scheme,
set up by staff and service users from
Autism Initiatives which is a charity supporting people with autism. Supporting people’s right to work.

More Photos